Antoinette Brown Blackwell

Dublin Core

Title

Antoinette Brown Blackwell

Description

Henrietta native Antoinette Brown Blackwell completed a literary course at Oberlin in 1847 and petitioned for acceptance into the theology program there. She was admitted to study with the understanding that the school would not license her to preach. In 1853, Blackwell became the first mainstream female Protestant minister in the U.S. when she was ordained as pastor in South Butler, Wayne County.

In 1833, Oberlin College in Ohio became the first to teach men and women, black and white, together in a co-educational setting, but even there women were excluded from some courses of study. In general, professional training and licensure remained out of reach for women until the mid-19th century. Rochester-area women were at the forefront in the push for integration.

Date

1900

Identifier

RASCA 200

Rights Holder

Carrie Chapman Catt Collection, National Susan B. Anthony Museum & House

Files

Copy of Blackwell.jpeg

Citation

“Antoinette Brown Blackwell,” accessed August 19, 2018, http://rocheritage.org/items/show/174.